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Author Topic: <<spoiler>> Sergio Martinez vs. Matthew Macklin Saturday, March 17  (Read 1085 times)
PHONETOOL
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« on: March 13, 2012, 06:23:37 AM »



The Broadcast Will Begin at 7 P.M. PT / 10 P.M. ET on HBO East

Sergio Martinez vs.Matthew Macklin

middleweights


Sergio Martinez has had anything but the typical path to the top of the boxing world, where he currently resides as the consensus middleweight champion of the world despite not possessing a single sanctioning body belt.  But now, at the age of thirty-eight, Martinez is trying to make the most of his time in the limelight of the sport before the inevitable effects of age force him to hang up his gloves.

Starting boxing at the age of twenty and turning pro at twenty-two, Martinez learned his craft on the job.  Beginning in Argentina and then going to Spain, Martinez got by on incredible physical talent while he learned the finer points of boxing.  Even now, when Martinez fights it is clear he is not a classical boxer.  The lightning fast southpaw who spent his early years cycling and playing soccer, often has his hands at his side, circles to his own left instead of the preferred going right for a southpaw, and jumps in and out hitting opponents without getting hit due to the pure physical advantages he has over virtually anyone at 160 lb.

Despite a lack of experience, Martinez started out his career 16-0-1, facing lesser competition in his homeland of Argentina.  Then on February 19, 2000, he got his first opportunity for a big fight taking on the future welterweight champ Antonio Margarito, who was 20-3 at the time, in Las Vegas.  Margarito had far more experience against better competition and wore Martinez down to a seventh round stoppage handing him his first loss.

Martinez regrouped and won his next eight fights back home in Argentina.  But for Martinez, something was missing.  He had the belief that he could be a champion, and to build his skills and his name he chose to leave his homeland traveling to Spain in search of better opportunities.  It was there that he linked up with Gabriel Sarmiento, who still trains Martinez today and has received a great deal of credit for Sergio’s success.  Martinez would win his first four fights in Spain against poor opposition and then enter into a fight with Richard Williams on eight days’ notice in England, where he was considered an underdog.  Martinez beat Williams by decision and later, in a rematch, stopped him in seven rounds.

After several more fights against lesser opposition and a move from welterweight to junior middleweight, Martinez got his first big opportunity since the Margarito fight.  At the time of the Margarito fight, Martinez was not ready for that level of competition, but this time he was prepared for the challenge.  Martinez faced Alex Bunema in October of 2008 for the interim WBC 154 lb title in an HBO televised fight.  Martinez dominated Bunema in impressive fashion for an eighth round stoppage to announce himself onto the national scene.  His next fight, also on HBO, was against Kermit Cintron who was 30-2 at the time.  He seemed to have knocked Cintron out in the seventh round, but the referee ruled it a headbutt after counting Cintron out.  Then the fight was ruled a draw, despite most believing Martinez had clearly won a decision.

Win or draw, Martinez had begun making a name for himself.  When Kelly Pavlik dropped out of his fight with Paul Williams scheduled for December 5, 2009, it was Martinez who got the call to fill in against the man known as “The Punisher” on short notice.  Williams and Martinez provided what many would call “the fight of the year” in an incredible slugfest in the ballroom at the Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City.  Each fighter scored knockdowns in round one to set the tone for what would become a vicious back and forth war that was fought at a high skill level with neither man willing to give in.  When all was said and done, Martinez was on the wrong end of a majority decision in a fight that could have gone either way, but went to Williams by respectable scores of 114-114, 115-113, and a ridiculous 119-110 from Pierre Benoist.

But once again, despite not winning on the cards, Martinez’s performance brought opportunity knocking.  Middleweight champion Kelly Pavlik was looking to rebound from his first loss to the ageless Bernard Hopkins.  Pavlik had gone north ten pounds to fight Hopkins and now was returning to continue his reign at 160 lb and lined up Martinez for April 17, 2010 at Boardwalk Hall.  This time Martinez would not be denied.

He started fast, dominating the first several rounds, befuddling the champion with his awkward style, speed, and movement.  Pavlik got into a groove in round five, scored a knockdown in round seven, and took the middle rounds.  But Martinez’s superior stamina and conditioning picked up late.  Martinez utterly dominated Pavlik rounds nine through twelve, opening cuts over both the champ’s eyes, landing at will, and even showboating with windmills that produced heavy straight left hand connects making his point that on this night he was the superior boxer.  Martinez walked away the consensus champ at 160 with the WBC, WBO, and Ring belts.

After the Pavlik fight, it was time to settle unfinished business with Paul Williams.  The rematch on November 20, 2010 was supposed to be another long war.  Instead Martinez, who by this point had physically grown into being a middleweight, landed a monster left hand in round two knocking Williams out cold and received knockout of the year.  Martinez had solidified his claim on the division, hit the number three spot on most P4P lists, and seemed to be an emerging star.

And certainly he had the qualifications to be a star.  Good looks, an exciting style that was producing more and more knockouts, and someone who acted as an upstanding gentleman outside the ring.  Martinez was gaining more and more notoriety for his work in the community including being a champion of rights for battered women and children who are victims of being bullied.  But his performances inside the ring may have been too good.  Martinez was far too dangerous and not popular enough to bring the top money fighters such as Mayweather or Pacquiao into the ring.

So he settled for what was left.  Martinez put on a clinic destroying Sergei Dzinziruk for an eighth round TKO.  In his last fight, Martinez looked somewhat human for the first time in a while but eventually did what he was supposed to do in stopping Darren Barker in eleven rounds.

But even with wins in the ring, Martinez lost his WBC and WBO titles to boxing politics.  The well-publicized move of the WBC taking his title and gifting it to Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. has been a sore spot for Martinez, who campaigned to get Chavez Jr. into the ring and eventually verbally blasted WBC President Jose Sulaiman for the Chavez fiasco and several other topics.

When Martinez, 48-2-2 (27 KOs), steps into the ring this Saturday for a St. Patty’s Day showdown in NYC with Ireland’s Mathew Macklin, he will do so with no official belts (although he has retained the Ring 160 lb title) but as the clear “Middleweight Champ.”  He is expected to beat Macklin but the tough Irishman should provide a stern test.  Macklin, 28-3 (19 KOs), is a full-size middleweight and will certainly come to fight.  But unless Martinez has lost a step to age, it is widely expected his speed and skill will be too much for the challenger and a largely Irish crowd will need more than the luck of the Irish to avoid going home empty handed.

The question for Martinez, assuming he beats Macklin, is where to go from there.  Martinez has all the intangibles to become a money-making star in the sport but is missing several outside factors to make this a reality.  A lack of depth in the current middleweight division has left Martinez without an opponent that brings the ability to test him and the name recognition to draw the interest of casual fans.

A showdown with Chavez Jr. would bring attention and crowds but not a true physical test as Martinez would likely dominate the young WBC belt holder.  Not to mention the obvious, that Chavez’s promoter seems perfectly fine with not bringing the money-making machine, Chavez Jr., anywhere near Martinez.  Fights with young guns like Dmitry Pirog, Gennady Golovkin, or Daniel Geale very well might bring a true physical test for Martinez but they don’t have the name recognition to excite anyone other than the hardcore fan.

With the clock ticking for Martinez in his late thirties, he has precious time to get the fights and exposure to cement himself in the history books.  If father time is good and he shares similar genes with Bernard Hopkins (because Martinez is known as being a 365-day-a-year gym rat and conditioning workhorse like Hopkins) he may have several more years to get fights that will allow him to make his mark on the fight game and go down as one of the great middleweights.

But if father time costs the athletic fighter just a bit of his natural gifts, it could spell a sudden end to his reign.  While Martinez shares Hopkins work ethic, he wins in a different fashion.  Hopkins, even in his prime relied more on boxing IQ than athletic ability, allowing him to fight into his forties despite losing a step athletically.  Martinez is a smart boxer but largely relies on freakish athletic talent.  If he loses a step it may spell his end, but for as long as he keeps his skills and talent he has all the makings of a fighter who can reign over the storied middleweight division and grow into one of boxing brighter stars. Article courtesy of Gary Purfield & The Boxing Tribune


The Undercard

Edwin Rodriguez vs. Don George

super middleweights


HBO



« Last Edit: March 17, 2012, 09:02:48 PM by PHONETOOL » Logged


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« on: March 13, 2012, 06:23:37 AM »

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« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2012, 01:26:03 PM »

I literally have zero interest in this fight.

Martinez is never gonna get Chavez Jr. @ 160lbs so he would actually be better served going back down to 154lbs to try and position himself for the Canelo vs. Mosley winner or the FMJ vs. Cotto loser, or even Kirkland.

Middleweight is a shitty division.
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« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2012, 01:26:03 PM »

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« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2012, 08:46:07 PM »

*i have less than zero interest...
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« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2012, 08:46:07 PM »

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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2012, 02:55:05 AM »

Wonder how Martinez v Ward would turn out. Would he able to handle the size difference and does he have enough skill to stand with Ward in the 1st place
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« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2012, 07:04:51 AM »

Wonder how Martinez v Ward would turn out. Would he able to handle the size difference and does he have enough skill to stand with Ward in the 1st place
Don't understand all the talk about Ward vs Martinez. Martinez is a small middleweight, why should he challenge Ward at this point of his career....it doesn't make sense. Right now we see fighters going up 6-7 weight divisions and we think it's easy, it can be done, etc etc. It's not just like that. Martinez ain't growing anymore so it doesn't make sense to take a fight straight with the best in that division, at a weight in which he'll be not comfortable for sure. It defies logic to me.
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« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2012, 09:28:12 AM »

Wonder how Martinez v Ward would turn out. Would he able to handle the size difference and does he have enough skill to stand with Ward in the 1st place

Ward would dominate Martinez. Too big, too good, too many dimensions to Wards game.
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« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2012, 10:39:20 AM »

Did anybody watch this? It was on "free" HBO so there's really no reason to avoid it.

Macklin did better than I had expected and HBO jumped all over Martinez the first chance they got and started criticizing him.

Martinez did what he always does: he took it slow and figured out his opponent. Macklin boxed well and was able to handle the occasional pot shots that Martinez threw. Bogus knockdown against Martinez midway through which woke him up. Martinez began coming on strong in the latter half. He figured out Macklin and started dropping left hand bombs to the body and head which couldn't miss. Macklin started fading the late rounds and Martinez finally closed the show in the 11th as he dropped Macklin twice and Buddy Mcgirt stopped it in between rounds.

So I think the Paul Williams 2 fight was a fluke. It seems to me that Martinez is sort of a slow starter and he doesn't throw a lot of 4+ punch combos until he's figured his opponent out. He comes on strong in the second half and that's when he starts going for the kill.

I sort of like it. Sure it would be nice to see someone blitzing people but it's also nice to see a fighter that is patient and has a strategy behind what they do.

HBO was really critical of him for that. Perhaps they couldn't wait to slam the champ so they could help protect JCC Jr. Larry Merchant is just about awful to listen to these days. Harold Lederman is a dreadful judge.

I mean, sure it's frustrating to see someone who's "consensus #3 p4p" (as the HBO team said ad nauseam) drop early rounds for not being busy enough, but you can just look back on Martinez's last 3 fights and it's the same pattern. Why were they surprised that it didn't turn out like Williams 2? The saying that you can't judge a fighter off of one performance goes for victories as well. That early knockout was not the norm, the slow and deliberate breaking down of a fighter over the 12 is. Late round knockouts are the status quo.

I was forgetting the undercard as it was happening. I have nothing to discuss about that.
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« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2012, 02:25:01 PM »

Also, the ring girl for round seven and HER ASS. HOLY SHIT. I thought they were using a fisheye lens because it was like DAMN.
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« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2012, 04:24:54 PM »

I think you need a cold shower Charlie..hahahaha Smiley
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« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2012, 04:43:02 PM »

This was a good fight. Very enjoyable. Macklin did well but Martinez was just too much for him.
I like Martinez's style, it's different.
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« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2012, 05:02:58 AM »

Dwyer telling like it is (this time):

Post Fight - Sergio Martinez v. Matthew Macklin - Dwyer / GamblersAdvisory.Com


@ Charlie: the Williams 2 knockout wasn't a fluke. Two reasons:

a) Martinez already had Williams figured out after the first fight;
b) It's easier to figure out an unorthodox fighter who comes right at you, is right in front of you with no defense (Williams), rather than fighters who fight defensive-minded, don't open up that much and try to counter the counterpuncher.

Martinez has problems when he has to press the action, start the tango. He can counter, we all know that. He can defend himself, he's not at his best pressing the action. Simple as that.

The whole HBO crew was clueless at best. As Dwyer pointed out, they look like a bunch of fanboys. Pacquiao this, Pacquiao that, all the other fighters don't mean s...t to them. Mayweather, Martinez, etc etc. They catch flack because they're not Pacquiao and Chavez Jr. It's utterly ridiculous. I save Steward just because he's Manny Steward. I'd like to know how much better Steward would look if not surrounded by fanboys.
Kellerman lost me by saying that he has Donaire @ n. 3 p4p, AHEAD of Martinez and probably JMM! Crazy.

A great fight took place but commentators were talking about everything BUT the fight. Then people criticizes on forums Gus Johnson for being over-dramatic in Salido-Juanma II ? GTFOH!
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« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2012, 12:54:23 PM »

Fluke is a poor word choice. It was a unique situation in which he had prior experience with the guy. What a meant was that Martinez sort of has a clear rhythm to his fights but HBO gets on him as if the normal was the Williams fight. Does that make sense? It's like if I everybody wanted me on their bowling team because of that ONE 280 I bowled despite my track record of 150s and then got mad at me for not being amazing.
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« Reply #12 on: March 24, 2012, 01:51:58 PM »

Gotta love this man:
"Why not tell him to fight Klitchko while you're at it?"

MARTINEZ vs MACKLIN - Lou DiBella's Post Fight comments: "He's a freak of nature... Klitschko Next?"


big props to Lou.
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